The ABC’s of Back to School: Finale!

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So…how’s it going in your classroom so far? Of if you’re still gearing up for a new school year, good luck! No matter where you teach or when you start, this is a super busy, stressful time of year!

In the past two posts, I have shared a few ideas for the beginning of the school year, Back to  School Bingo and Me Collages. I want to share an idea I used once I was out of the classroom and working with small groups of Gifted and Talented students, the I Am Poem! I chose this poem because my goal for the year was to help students develop a sense of identity and become self-regulated learners. I had seen this type of poem before, and then I was introduced to a unit in the Autonomous Learner Model book by George Betts, called “Journey Into Self.”  The same publisher also has another unit called “Journey Into My World”. I decided to build my year-long theme around this concept and to launch the theme, I had students create visual I Am Poems!  You can see their presentations HERE; many had their photo on the initial slide and throughout the poem, so I had to delete those for student privacy. I did have some students turn their slides into a movie with music, and some just created a Quicktime or iMovie for this activity! Another student used Glogster to create her visual poemOh…the image up at the top of this blog is an idea I always wanted to do, but never got around to it…creating an “I Am” Wall with the students’ names and first line from their poem!

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To start with, I created an I Am Poem for myself to serve as a model for the students, then walked them through the creation of their own poem, using THIS template. You can find many variations of this same template online.  Here’s a sample poem that one of my students created! Next, I had students use copyright free images they found online (that’s an entire lesson in and of itself!) to turn their poem into a visual I Am Poem in Google Slides!

The classroom teacher for my 5th grade GT students wanted the students to create math goals in their Advanced Learning Plan, so I had them all create a math version of the I Am Poem. And at the end of the year, I had all of my students complete an End of Year I Am Poem to reflect on their learning throughout the year. Some added in this new part of their poem to their Google Slide presentations.  My younger students did something called an I Am Story.  Click HERE for an example by one of my students!

IMG_0445So to help you get your classroom rules and expectations set up…here are the final ABC’S OF BACK TO SCHOOL, based on my “bestselling” packet I created for my students and their parents back in my classroom days.

Image result for s gifSubstitutes: I included my expectations for students when I had a sub. I expected my students to respect all subs they had, no matter what, and I always followed through on both positive and negative comments from the sub. Here’s an article on how to prepare your class for a sub! How do you prepare your class for subs? Comment below!

Image result for T gifTelephones: In the years before cell phones were common, we only had a phone in the workroom across the hall to use (primitive, I know!) I had to set expectations for the use of this phone for my students. It amazed me how many times my students would ask me to use the phone to call parents to bring in forgotten homework….Uh…NO! These days, all schools and classrooms need to have cell phone guidelines (for teachers too, LOL!)

Image result for Q gifQuizzes and Tests: Just verbiage about doing your best, studying in advance, sharing the test grade with parents, etc. A great idea for intermediate and secondary teachers is to give Open Note quizzes…students can use their notes to answer!  What you are really assessing is their note taking skills! I would have my students staple their notes to the quiz. Not all quizzes were open note, but you should have seen the looks on their faces of the non-notetakers when I announced an Open Note quiz! Have you ever done this in your class? Comment below!

Image result for U gifUsing Computers: Since I wrote my guidelines back in 1998, things have changed, and laptops and Chromebooks are a necessary tool for students in the classroom. My guidelines are no longer valid! However, guidelines still need to be set for the proper use and care of these expensive school supplies.

Image result for Letter V gifVolunteers: My plea to parents for classroom volunteers! Since I taught intermediate, I did not have as much use for volunteers (and I was somewhat of a control freak :-), but I did need them for classroom parties and Friday folders! I appreciated my parent volunteers so much; always be sure to take good care of them!

Image result for W gifWhen will progress reports (report cards) come out: This is where I included my school/district’s policies and dates for progress reports.

Image result for X gifXtra Credit: I made sure students and parents understood that I did not give any extra credit, but they could earn Bonus Points (see “B” back in Part 1!) that could slightly help their grade.

Image result for Y gifYes, we will be using the library each week:  School library days, policies, rules, etc.

Image result for Z gifZoo: No, we’re not going there! I couldn’t think of anything else for “Z” so I used this section to discuss the various field trips we WERE going on, permission slips, chaperones, etc.

And that’s a WRAP for the ABC’s of Back to School! I hope that you will use the “I Am” poem with your students! Joy Thomas, on the Crixeo website, says about these poems: “It’s an invitation to ask ourselves: How do I show up in the world? How do I want to show up in the world? What do I want to give and receive out of life?”

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The ABC’s of Back to School, Part 2!

The ABC’s of Back to School, Part 2! More ideas on what teachers need to communicate to students and parents in the first few weeks of school! I also share a FUN activity I did with my students the first week: “Me Collages!”

IMG_0445First of all, be sure to check out my last blog, Part 1 of The ABC’s of Back to School. This is where you will get my A to I information I put in my back-to-school packet for students and parents

Screen Shot 2018-08-02 at 12.21.37 PMAnd, have you checked out my Back to School Bingo on Teachers Pay Teachers? This is a fun activity to do with any grade level on your first day or first week!

Before I start on J – S, I want to tell you about a super fun activity I did with my 5th and 6th graders during the first week of school! I can’t remember where I got the idea from (this was 23 years ago!), but I found directions online for creating these with kids. Using butcher papers and markers, I had students help each other trace the outline of each other and then cut it out. Next, they created a “Me Collage”, adding in words, designs, photos, and illustrations of who they were as a person, and as well as their favorite hobbies and passions. The students presented their Me Collages to the class, then we hung him in the hallway. Check out some of their creations below!

Now on to J – S from my Classroom Packet!

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J is for June Box: Since our school got out in June, I had a special box where all the toys or gizmos I had to collect from students would reside until the last day of school, or until parents came to me to request them. I ended up having quite a collection to give back in June: yo-yo’s, Pokemon cards, Beanie Babies, action figures, etc.

Image result for K gifK is for Kid Safety: Here’s my exact wording from the packet: “It is my responsibility to make sure that my students learn in a safe environment. We need to be safe our on the playground, at lunch, on field trips, and in our classroom. School supplies need to be used in a safe manner and experiments conducted safely. Poor choices will result in immediate consequences.”

Image result for L gifL is for Long Term Assignments and Projects: Our job as 5th/6th-grade teachers in our school was to prepare our students for middle school. I would often assign projects or writing that would take 3-4 weeks or longer.  After hearing about stressed parents trying to help their child finish that assignment in just 1-2 nights, I made sure to communicate to both students and parents to manage their time and START EARLY! I eventually began assigning staggered due dates (for proposal, rough drafts, conferences on progress, etc. – these were interim assessments before I knew that term!).

Image result for m gifM is for Magic Scrap: I have to admit…this was one of the BEST ideas I ever came up with (and believe me, there were many bad ones!). One of my expectations is that all students helped clean up at the end of the day, especially the floor so our vacuuming crew after school did not have to do their job on an obstacle course! So, to get the floor super clean, I would “pick out” a scrap of trash, or a school supply item on the floor. My students would frantically rush around trying to find the magic scrap; they would pick up a pile of stuff off the floor and bring to me waiting by the garbage can, where I would pronounce it as NOT the Magic Scrap or YES, that was indeed the Magic Scrap. If it was a “No”, off they would run to collect more stuff!  When the floor was sufficiently cleaned up, lo and behold, there would be the sought after “Magic Scrap” from a lucky student! That student would receive a Homework Pass which would excuse them from homework for one night.  Believe me, these were in high demand (see “P”)!

Image result for n gifNo is for No T.V.! (unless you have read your required 30 minutes at night): Lately I have been reading about how reading logs can be detrimental in getting kids to enjoy reading...but back in the 90’s, I used them and they worked for me, parents and my students.  My expectation for my students 120 minutes a week of reading, and then to record what they were reading on the log. I didn’t care if they were reading a novel, textbook, a magazine article, a comic book, (appropriate) stuff on the internet, or picture books, as long as they were READING! They could do all their minutes in one night, over the weekend, or could spread out the minutes over the week. Parents had to sign the log before it was turned in.  Do you use reading logs?

Image result for o gifO is for On the Chart, Oh No!: My consequence/behavior system was multi-tiered:
* 1st incident: A verbal warning
* 2nd incident: A check on the chart under their assigned number (no names and the numbers were changed often)
* 3rd incident: Another check and a recess missed
* 4th incident: Another check and an Inappropriate Behavior Form (used school-wide)
* 5th incident: Another check, a Behavior Referral (school form) and a phone call home
(Disclaimer: I realize things have changed since I used this system 25 years ago, and schools and teachers may have different ideas for behavior expectations. All teachers at my school had to have their behavior plans approved by the administration.)

Image result for p gifP is for Passes – Homework Passes! A homework pass could take the place of one nightly assignment (but I had the prerogative to say “no passes” for any assignment I needed them to have the next day). The pass had to be attached to the assignment when turned on, and they would then receive full credit! Students could use one pass per week. The passes were given for prizes in games, for rewards and recognition, and as a “thank you” from me for students who went out of their way to help others. I made my own, but you can find many already created on Teachers Pay Teachers!

Image result for Q gifQ is for Quiet Voices: I didn’t expect my students to work in silence during independent work time (I wanted them to ask questions about their work to peers and collaborate!), but I did expect low voices during work time. Many students actually liked to get as much work done at school if they had busy sports/activities schedules after school. Since I used this time to confer or help students, I did not want to be walking around and shushing kids all the time!  What are your expectations for noise during work time?Image result for r gif

R is for Recess: Yay, we all love recess (except for teachers when they have recess duty in February!) However, sometimes my students had to miss recess as a consequence for behavior or missing work. Or, they could stay in for positive reasons, such as to get extra help from me or assist me with set-up for an activity (of course I would have many volunteers on cold and snowy days!)

Image result for s gifS is for Standards: I was “lucky” enough to be a classroom teacher during the nationwide implementation of education standards in the 1990’s. Our workload was suddenly increased by the task of collecting specific pieces of student work and assessments to determine if they had met a particular standard or not. Standards are still around, and it was important for me then, as it is for teachers now, to make parents and students aware of the standards your state and district are using.

Stay tuned for the rest of the Back to School ABC’s in next week’s post! Best of luck to you getting YOUR school started! Don’t forget to subscribe to my blog if you want to see future posts, and a HUGE THANK YOU to those that already have!

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Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

 

 

The A-Z of Back to School for Teachers! (Part 1)

Hey…just me jumping on the Back to School Bandwagon…because suddenly in mid-July, BTS was ALL over the place…social media, store ads, TpT…everywhere! So I am entering the fray of the BTS Frenzy!

First off, I have a NEW PRODUCT ON TPT – Back to School Bingo! This is a fun activity I used with my students on the first day of school (I revised this for the first day after Fall Break, Christmas Break and Spring Break…those are coming soon!

CLICK HERE FOR BACK TO SCHOOL BINGO!

Screen Shot 2018-07-19 at 7.55.30 PMFirst BTS idea; a few weeks ago I uploaded my FIRST for-sale product to Teachers Pay Teachers!  I can’t think of a better way to start the school year than with PASSION PROJECTS!  What better way to start the year than engaging your students in working on a long-term project on something they love? Also, you can find out SO much about your new students by surveying or interviewing them on what their hobbies, interests, and passions are! I did not create this until I was out of the classroom and working with small groups of gifted students, but I would SO implement this in the first month of the school year! It could be your 80/20 project for the first half of the school year, or even the entire school year!

Hop on over to this product in my Teachers Pay Teachers store! And PLEASE, if you do purchase, I would appreciate some reviews on this in TpT.  If you don’t end up purchasing, please share the product on social media and with other teachers!

I had 25 back to school seasons in my career…and like many other teachers, got smarter each year and changed up how I started my school year to make it better, smoother, and less stressful for the students, their parents and ME!  So I now have an A-Z guide to help you, the amazing hard-working teacher, have a less stressful Back to School season!

First, and foremost, the amount of time you spend on routines and procedures should never be underestimated! Take it from me…during my first few years of teaching, I just barreled right into the curriculum and then paid for it later when I couldn’t understand why my students could not seem to know what to do to turn in assignments, find materials, sign-out for the bathroom, etc. By my final years in the classroom, I was spending a good WEEK on these routines and longer if necessary! I made sure to give them lots of reminders and visuals hanging in the classroom.

Second, the amount of time you spend on making your rules and expectations clear can also never be underestimated!  Those darn mistakes the first few years were not repeated again! I made sure the students understood my recognition system for doing the right thing and the consequences for not doing the right thing. More importantly, I made sure parents understood these expectations as well!

And…speaking of parents, there is no such thing as too much communication to parents!  Well, I guess there is common sense; parents don’t like being inundated every hour or day with texts and emails…but always err on the side of too much!

So…along about my third year, I finally got around to creating a beginning of the year packet for my students and parents. This packet had all the procedures, expectations, and information that I could think of…and I’m sure it was overwhelming to some students and parents, but it was my way of making sure I covered everything! I spent the first few weeks going over this packet and reiterating things…and made up daily review games that allowed students to win homework passes (these passes could be used to get out of homework on certain evenings! I also sent home the packet and had both students and parents initial each section. Here are the items I included in my packet…did it in A-Z style!

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 Afternoon Clubs: My teammates and I used to set aside one after-school day a week where students could stay and get extra help on ANYTHING they needed…homework, projects, math and reading skills, etc. We made sure parents knew they were staying and had a way to get home after the club.

 Bonus Points: These were my “digital badges” before I knew what digital badges were.  I gave bonus points for various things…keeping up with their planner, typing assignments (which was still a novel/optional thing back in the 90’s), prizes in games, etc. These would go into the grade book and could jump their grade up slightly!

Current Events: This was an activity I did all year…and I think one of the best things I ever did as a teacher! I created a schedule of when each student would present a current event they found in the newspaper or a magazine (now I would be using Newsela for this!) and do a recap of the article for the class. I gave them guidelines for what was needed to be included in the presentation; I can’t remember them right now but will try to find the handout. Some days, the article was so interesting or debatable that we ended up discussing it for over an hour and I had to adjust my schedule! 

 

Daytimers: These were the planners students were required to have. Our school sold them, but students could purchase their own as well. At the end of the school day, I would take 5-10 minutes to talk about the homework expected of the class. I wrote it out on a template on the overhead (ugh – the 90’s!) and they were expected to show the daytimer daily to their parents and get initials each day.

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Expectations: Here was my list ( I realize these are from 20 years ago and many things have changed in schools!)

  1. Respect all people and property in the classroom.
  2. Use quiet voices during work time.
  3. Raise your hand to speak during class discussions (this didn’t always happen during our heated currents events debates!)
  4. Wait for a speaker to finish speaking before raising your hand to comment.
  5. Use a polite listening position when someone else is speaking.
  6. The class will walk quietly in a straight line through the halls when going to Specials and other events (this was a school-wide expectation).
  7. School supplies will be used only for the purpose they were intended (this came about after a student bored a hole in his desk with the sharp point in his compass!)
  8. Use the Sign Out Sheet if you need to leave the classroom for any reason.
  9. 9. Try to use the restroom as little as possible during the school day and not during a lesson or presentation (this was because I had sometimes had serial bathroom goers!).
  10. Please chew your gum in places other than this classroom and school.

FImage result for F gifriday Folders: The parent’s best friend and a school-wide expectation (at the most recent schools I worked at, it had been changed to Thursday folders and most of the info is on the school website). These folders came home every Friday and contained student work, school announcements, flyers from outside organizations, and a sheet with my comments about the students’ week and a place for parents to initial and make comments. I used to “love” when a folder came back on Monday with no initials and the entire contents still in it!

Image result for G gifGrades: This, of course, is where I would explain my grading police that our school district used.

 

 

Image result for H gifHow am I doing? Before the age of parent portals, where parents can log in and see grades for their student on a weekly basis, I would have the option for students to fill out a 1/2 sheet on what was their current grades in all subjects. If students took this home, filled it out and returned, they received Bonus Points. Some students did it all the time (many were expected by their parents to do so) and some never did. But the option was there!

Image result for I gifIllness:  In this section, I explained how student needed to take ownership of finding out about work missed while they were absent. I had a 1/2 sheet form called “We Missed You!” which let the student know what they missed that day.

So that’s it for Part 1 of my A-Z packet! Tune in next week for Part 2! In the meantime, BEST OF LUCK GETTING YOUR SCHOOL STARTED! REMEMBER, I AM HERE TO HELP YOU!