More Math Resources for Remote and Home Learning!

If I were in charge of education right now, I’d tell all parents and teachers who are struggling to teach their kids at home, that it’s okay if they don’t get a perfect learning experience each and every day. Their happiness and mental health is far more important right now…just do what you can! – Jan Anttila (me!)

This is the fourth post in a series of blogs to help both teachers and parents with resources for remote/digital/home learning. One blog wasn’t enough to contain all the math resources for both remote and homeschool learning…so here is Part 2! Oh, and check out my previous posts with resources for remote and homeschool learning!
Reading Resources for Homeschool and Remote Learning
Project-Based Learning for Homeschools and Remote Learning
Math Resources for Learning and Homeschools

More Apps and Websites!

Operation Math has been so popular with my students; they get to be a “James Bond” type of secret agent and solve computation problems to find the code that unlocks doors, defuses bombs, and defeats Dr. Odd.

Some apps for multiplication…Times Tables Kids 12×12 (photo on left) proved to be so engaging for one of my more challenging students that he told me he actually looked forward to coming to tutoring! He worked week after week on each table, unlocking more numbers and earning stars, which I translated to Class Dojo points. This app is FREE! For the same student, when we worked on homework, I had him use the Times Tables Interactive app (photo on the right) when working on word problems. My goal was to get him to learn all of his times tables, but in the meantime, this app was a huge help.

Keep the Change is a wonderful app for helping kids learn money math skills. It has several engaging activities at various levels. One of my tutoring students loved this so much that we started each session and kept track of her score for a five minute period, and she would earn Class Dojo badges for improvement.

Touch Math is a program that helps young kids and struggling math learners with computation by adding in “touchpoints” to each number; the number of touchpoints correlates with each number, i.e., the number 7 will have 7 touchpoints. This is an entire math program that schools and teachers can purchase, but I’ve managed to find free samples online, and they have several apps that are now free in order to help parents and teachers with remote and home learning.

Whiteboard app: My students love working their math problems on the free Whiteboard app, much more than on paper. I love it too! I’ve also used this app for vocabulary Pictionary and for practicing spelling and phonics.

Jeopardy Labs is a wonderful website with all kinds of math games for learning and reviewing math skills! You can make your own or just use one of the hundreds created by teachers…just browse for the math concept your child is working on!

I still didn’t share all of my math resources…but I want to get this published before another week of remote and home learning! Coming soon…my next post with the last of my favorite math resources!

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Math Resources for Remote Learning and Homeschools: Part 1

three-706895_1920This is the THIRD in my series of resources and ideas to help with this unprecedented time in education…online, remote, distance and homeschool learning for millions of students! This time…my focus is on math resources!

Websites

 

Khan Academy and Khan Academy Kids: I’m sure you all know about this website; I have my students use this and I use it when I need to brush up on long-forgotten math skills before helping the students (parents, you might need to do this too! :-). Tutorials, videos, and practice activities are all included and you can set your students up in order to track their activity and progress. To help all of us, they are offering sample schedules for all grades, as well as resources for parents and teachers! Khan Academy Kids is an app you can download; perfect for pre-school, kindergarten and first grade, as well as for struggling math learners in other grades. (Note: An app version is available as well.)

IXLIXL Learning: When my students need to review or practice the skills we are working on, I have them use this website. (also in app format!) No fun games or videos, but this type of practice is necessary mastering for basic skills. If your student(s) are struggling with a question, they can get hints, and if they get a question wrong, the right method/answer is explained to them. Both parents and teachers can set up accounts; it’s not free, but membership fees are fairly low.

Mr. Nussbaum online math games Oh my, this website is a treasure chest of SO many fun games and activities in ALL subject areas! I have mainly used his math ones as so many of the students I tutor need help in this area the most. There are games and contests for computation skills, decimals, fractions, geometry, probability and SO much more! His website is free and for even more resources, there is an upgraded site with even more resources, and during the Coronavirus crisis, he is offering 80% off for parents and teachers!

Apps

Here are two of my students’ all-time favorite apps! The first is Sushi Monster, a fun practice activity for addition and multiplication. My students love the different monsters and the sounds they make when they eat their “sushi” (the number needed for a product or sum). There are different levels for both addition and multiplication. The next one is Math Zombies, another fun one where students can practice all computation skills by turning approaching zombies back into human kids.

Number Line by MLC

Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 5.04.49 PMThis wonderful app takes the old classroom wall number line and puts it to shame! Perfect for beginning and struggling math students, it helps students visually understand “jumping” forward for addition, and backward for subtraction. Students can also practice visually see how different strategies for multiplication and division work. The number line can be modified for different number intervals as well.

Mr. Nussbaum 46 Game Super App: This app has more than just math games, but there are a few math ones that are student favorites. One is the “Cash Out” game (top left) that helps students learn money math skills and how to count money and make change. You can customize the game to make it easier or harder. The other is Tony’s Fraction Pizza Shop where students can work on fraction skills: identifying, reducing and equivalency.

Number Frames: This wonderful resource can be used as an iPad app, a website activity, or a download. It has been extremely helpful for my students just to learn how to add and subtract; the visual support is so helpful (and they can change the dots into butterflies and other icons!) While my younger students are working on math games and activities, I have the iPad with Number Frames right by their side so they can use it for help.

Well, this post has gone on WAY too long already…I have many other math resources to share with both teachers and parents, but that will have to be in Part 2. In the meantime, please read these words of wisdom below that I found on social media. Hang in there, everyone!

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From Thanksgiving to New Year’s: Holiday Activities for the Classroom!

Blog Happy Holidays

The holidays are coming up before you know it, it’s time to get some activities ready for this busy holiday season! I remember that December was one of the hardest months for me to teach as I was not only trying to keep excited kids engaged and learning, but I also had all of the family Christmas shopping and preparation going on. So I hope that these ideas will make your holiday season a little easier!

Holiday Roll a Math-Word-Problem Story

My tutoring students and I have had so much fun with this for the past few years, and I wish I had created this during my school teaching days! Many of the students I work with do fine with math computation, but when it comes to integrating reading into math, they have difficulty. So in addition to having students use close reading to SOLVE math word problems, having them WRITE their own word problems opens up a whole new way of thinking. Not only do they need to come up up with a challenging word problem, but they also need to craft a real-world situation around that problem. Here’s a great blog post from Primarily Speaking on having younger students write their own word problems. Here’s another resource from ThoughtCo. for you on how to lead students through writing word problems.

Screen Shot 2018-10-01 at 8.09.19 PMIn my product, Teachers Pay Teachers Year-Round Roll-a-Math-Problem Story, I have sheets for Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s (as well as all of the rest of the holidays The product will open in Google Drive so you can make your own copy, and on many of the sheets are links for students to find out more about customs, traditions, and people of holidays. I am also currently working on a Hanukkah one and will update the product in TpT soon. Check the slideshow below to see some past ones written by my tutoring students for both Halloween and Thanksgiving.

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Do you want a FREEBIE of this fun, easy activity? Keep reading!

Fantasy Holiday Shopping!

Oh my gosh, my students had SO much fun with this during the last holiday season! This is such a perfect way to get students to practice their math computation skills in an authentic way. I saved all my Christmas catalogs that came in the mail and brought them to the tutoring session, along with the handout I needed for the math work: addition, subtraction, multiplication or division. Students then went on a “shopping spree” using the catalogs, recording their items and the cost and then doing the appropriate computation. I had a few students make a presentation of their “shopping” and had them include WHO the gift was for, and why they were getting that particular gift for them…so there’s a literacy integration as well!

CLICK HERE TO GRAB YOUR COPY OF FANTASY HOLIDAY GIFT SHOPPING!

Fantasy Holiday Gift Shopping (1)   A8F2BD1F-42DF-431D-9BFE-88C40EED1D2B

Using the same “Fantasy Shopping” idea, I had my high school student use her list of vocabulary words taken from texts we had read and then use those words in explanations of what luxury item gifts she could buy if she had the money.  I gave her a list of websites with outrageous, incredibly expensive gifts. This was great practice in using words in context, as well as utilizing descriptive words.

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Another holiday vocabulary activity I did with a middle school student was to have her choose words from her personal word wall on Padlet (these were words from texts we had read that she was unfamiliar with), and use a FREE account on Smilebox to create greeting cards with these words. Again, a great way to practice writing skills and using vocabulary in context. In her cards below, can you tell which ones her vocabulary words? 🙂

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I hope you and your friends and family have a wonderful holiday season!

Here’s your freebie…click HERE to receive your Freebie of the Christmas Roll-a-Word Problem story! Click HERE to purchase the entire year-round set of the roll-a-word problems!

Copy of Math Roll-a-Word Problem

 

Is Your Classroom Literacy Rich? Part 3: Classroom Libraries

I believe that a classroom library is the heartbeat of a teacher’s environment. It is the window into an educator’s own personality, and it reflects the importance of literacy in the classroom. I believe that every teacher — no matter what subject he or she teaches — should have one.

Heather Wolpert-Gawron on Edutopia

Growing up, my favorite place in the world was a library, and it still is! As an adult, I have continued to frequent public libraries, first with my daughters while they were growing up and now on my own.  I love that the majority of tutoring I do takes place in public libraries! I remember clearly being in the library of Hartman Elementary School in Omaha Nebraska, around 1968 and discovering Little House on the Prairie, the book that for me, changed my life.  I had been a voracious reader before that, but this was a book I connected to in a powerful way.

Teachers need to ensure that our students have opportunities to connect with books, right in their classrooms. Classroom libraries are one of the most important elements of a Literacy-Rich Environment.  In my previous post on this topic, I provided an overview of all the important literacy elements for a classroom. Now it’s time to delve more into how to make your classroom library the best it can be!

All students must be able to access, use, and evaluate information in order to meet the needs and challenges of the twenty-first century. – NCTE Statement, May 2017

Note the use of the words “all students”. Classroom libraries are most often associated with primary classrooms, but they need to be in intermediate, middle and high school classrooms. One of my former school colleagues, who now teaches middle school writing, sent me photos of her classroom library in response to a request for photos. She said that her students always ask why she has a classroom library if she teaches writing! I applaud her for having the library, pictured below, because as Stephen King says, “If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.”

Middle School Classroom Library
Carol’s Middle School Writing Classroom Library

But classroom libraries are not just for reading and writing teachers in middle and high school! Content area teachers should not only have books on and about their content in their classrooms but all kinds of reading material…fiction, informational books, resource, magazines, etc. There will always be those early finishers…of assignments or tests. Why not have reading material handy? Perhaps one of those students in your math class might come across one of your favorite books and ask to borrow it? Every teacher can make a difference in the reading life of a student! Check out the classroom libraries in these classrooms: (l–r, top to bottom – science, art, art again and music). By the way, I put out several requests to teachers for photos of classroom libraries in math, science, social studies, industrial arts, etc. and received NO response.  Do you know of any teachers who have one? Let me know!

Now, down to the nuts and bolts of putting together a classroom library. In a presentation at CCIRA many years ago, Linda Cornwell, formerly of Scholastic books, stated that students in classrooms with well-designed and well-stocked library collections:

  • exhibit more positive attitudes toward reading
  • read more widely for a variety of purposes
  • demonstrate higher levels of reading achievement

In addition, she suggested the classroom library should:

  • look inviting to all students
  • be organized for easy access and materials
  • include a comfortable area for reading
  • offer an array of materials from many genres

Some things to consider when organizing your library:

    • How will you store your books to make sure they can be easily accessible to students?
      • My personal preference is colorful, plastic tubs, or even just clear ones. But years ago, while in observing in a classroom, I found this unique storage system…one of those rotating racks they have in stores for browsing!
    • Do you have guidelines for the use of the library?
      • I’m sure you don’t want students getting up in the middle of an important lesson to browse for books, so you need to let them know then the library is “open” and when it is “closed”. You could create some signs for your library letting them know when it’s okay to browse. In addition, there need to be guidelines for when students are using the library…here are some ideas:
        • how to respect books
        • how to shelve books back in the correct place
        • the use of quiet voices in the library and the importance of respecting others’ reading time
        • And for even more ideas on guidelines, you can find so many ready-made posters on Teachers Pay Teachers!

  • Have you shown students how to find materials?  Are there signs to help them?
    • Just as modeling when teaching something new to your students, you will need to model and/or explain how to use and check out and return materials from the library. The younger the student, the more modeling is needed. For secondary classrooms, the procedures can be more relaxed, but I’m sure you still don’t want to lose everything in your library! Check out this teacher’s blog post on how she introduces her classroom library to her students!
  • How have you categorized and arranged the materials?  Does the organization promote the reading of different types of materials?

    • I love that Teachers Pay Teachers have sellers who offer book bin labels in all genres! And of course, you can always make your own!
    • I found several blogs and websites for ideas on how to organize your library. This blog discusses organizing the library by genre; Reading Rockets stresses that there is no right or wrong way to organize and they offer several suggestions, including the reminder to LABEL your books so they can find their way home if misplaced. Here’s a blog on Scholastic with more organization ideas.
  • Does your library invite browsing and using? Is there a comfortable area to read?
    • Check out these photos and decide for yourself! (Note that you don’t need to spend a lot of money to make it inviting and have comfortable seating…pillows, a rug, a lamp, beach chairs….just simple things will work!
  • Do many of the books have their covers facing out?
    • I had never even thought about having my books facing out (probably because I was an intermediate teacher coming from a high school teaching job) until I read the chapter in Jim Trelease’s book, The Read-Aloud Handbook, and learned about rain gutters in the classroom…wait, what? Rain gutters? YES! Trelease promoted the practice of hanging rain gutters on your classroom wall in order to house books with their covers facing out. Think about it…when you go to a book store next time, look around to see HOW many books are facing out so buyers will notice them.  So, the same thing in the classroom; books facing out will help the “buyers” in your classroom notice books easier. And while you are teaching a lesson, those students whose minds wander can study all the books and decide which one to check out sooner.
    • After I talked about this idea and showed photos at our district literacy training sessions, we suddenly had a rash of rain gutters popping up in classrooms! Eventually, when new schools were built, shelves specifically for this purpose were added. But even if you don’t have shelving like this, there are other ways to have your books facing out. Check out the photo gallery below.

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Oh, and last but not least…if you are a new teacher who does not have many books for your library, and you can’t necessarily afford a binge at Barnes and Noble…here are a few ideas for finding books:

  • Retiring teachers
  • Garage and estate sales
  • Library used book sales
  • Donors Choose
  • Ask parents for book donations
  • Use book club points
  • Craig’s List and eBay
  • Scholastic warehouse sales
  • Create an Amazon wish list and share with parents
  • Kids Need to Read donation application

A classroom library: If you build it, they will read.

– Jim Bailey, title of his Nerdy Book Club blog post

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