Math Resources for Remote Learning and Homeschools: Part 1

three-706895_1920This is the THIRD in my series of resources and ideas to help with this unprecedented time in education…online, remote, distance and homeschool learning for millions of students! This time…my focus is on math resources!

Websites

NewselaKhan Academy and Khan Academy Kids: I’m sure you all know about this website; I have my students use this and I use it when I need to brush up on long-forgotten math skills before helping the students (parents, you might need to do this too! :-). Tutorials, videos, and practice activities are all included and you can set your students up in order to track their activity and progress. To help all of us, they are offering sample schedules for all grades, as well as resources for parents and teachers! Khan Academy Kids is an app you can download; perfect for pre-school, kindergarten and first grade, as well as for struggling math learners in other grades. (Note: An app version is available as well.)

IXLIXL Learning: When my students need to review or practice the skills we are working on, I have them use this website. (also in app format!) No fun games or videos, but this type of practice is necessary mastering for basic skills. If your student(s) are struggling with a question, they can get hints, and if they get a question wrong, the right method/answer is explained to them. Both parents and teachers can set up accounts; it’s not free, but membership fees are fairly low.

Mr. Nussbaum online math games Oh my, this website is a treasure chest of SO many fun games and activities in ALL subject areas! I have mainly used his math ones as so many of the students I tutor need help in this area the most. There are games and contests for computation skills, decimals, fractions, geometry, probability and SO much more! His website is free and for even more resources, there is an upgraded site with even more resources, and during the Coronavirus crisis, he is offering 80% off for parents and teachers!

Apps

Here are two of my students’ all-time favorite apps! The first is Sushi Monster, a fun practice activity for addition and multiplication. My students love the different monsters and the sounds they make when they eat their “sushi” (the number needed for a product or sum). There are different levels for both addition and multiplication. The next one is Math Zombies, another fun one where students can practice all computation skills by turning approaching zombies back into human kids.

Number Line by MLC

Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 5.04.49 PMThis wonderful app takes the old classroom wall number line and puts it to shame! Perfect for beginning and struggling math students, it helps students visually understand “jumping” forward for addition, and backward for subtraction. Students can also practice visually see how different strategies for multiplication and division work. The number line can be modified for different number intervals as well.

Mr. Nussbaum 46 Game Super App: This app has more than just math games, but there are a few math ones that are student favorites. One is the “Cash Out” game (top left) that helps students learn money math skills and how to count money and make change. You can customize the game to make it easier or harder. The other is Tony’s Fraction Pizza Shop where students can work on fraction skills: identifying, reducing and equivalency.

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Number Frames: This wonderful resource can be used as an iPad app, a website activity, or a download. It has been extremely helpful for my students just to learn how to add and subtract; the visual support is so helpful (and they can change the dots into butterflies and other icons!)

 

Well, this post has gone on WAY too long already…I have many other math resources to share with both teachers and parents, but that will have to be in Part 2. In the meantime, please read these words of wisdom below that I found on social media. Hang in there, everyone!

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Supporting Each Other: Reading Resources for Homeschool and Remote Learning

“The most valuable resource that all teachers have is each other. Without collaboration our growth is limited to our own perspectives.” – Robert John Meehan.

Right now, many parents are having to become their child’s teacher and it’s so important that teachers and parents support each other during the coronavirus and school closures! I’ve seen that all the teacher-bloggers are writing about how parents can support their child’s learning at home, and how teachers can set up remote learning opportunities for their child. I thought I would weigh in on some of my favorite resources for teaching reading that can easily be used at home.

Newsela: Grades 3-12:  I have used this website full or informational articles for years, even though in the last year they made much of the content only accessible via a paid subscription. But upon visiting their website today, I saw this amazing announcement!

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The articles are either taken from newspapers around the world and adapted for various reading levels, or are written specifically for students. In addition to news articles, they have biographies, primary sources, famous speeches, and pro/con pieces. Each article comes with a writing prompt and a quiz. The quizzes can be very challenging, and I spend time teaching my students how to use close reading for the questions and strategies for choosing the correct answer.  I have used this Newsela reading log for my students to keep track of their articles and scores. I have also used a Google spreadsheet with bar graphs for a more visual representation of the students’ progress; feel free to copy the sample and use it for your child or students! FYI…parents can sign up for a parent account!


Readworks (1st – 12th): Both parents and teachers can sign up for free accounts on this outstanding website for reading passages. You can find fiction stories, narrative poems, biographies, and informational articles on anything. Each passage comes with a question set, vocabulary activities and a writing prompt that always requires the student to provide text evidence in their response. I used these free resources from Jennifer Findley’s website to help students with finding evidence.  Readworks is also offering tips on remote learning, as well as a webinar on “Effective Remote Learning”; click HERE for more information.


Learning A-Z/Reading A-Z (K-8): Learning A-Z is offering FREE digital resources to teachers for the rest of the school year…learn more HERE! I love this website so much that when I started my tutoring business, I bought a yearly subscription for $109.95 – one of the best buys ever! This website has leveled books, both fiction and non-fiction, as well as phonics, sight word, and reading comprehension passages and activities.  I could not begin to dream of teaching reading without this website! Important tip: In order to save paper and printing costs, I download the books or passages on my Macbook, put them in my iCloud folder and then open up the folder on my iPad for students to read. They can also highlight the text on the iPad!

And….if this website wasn’t already incredible, they recently added graphic books! This has been a HUGE hit with my tutoring students!


Common Lit (Grade 3-12) is yet another excellent website for students to practice reading skills and strategies, and both teachers and parents can sign up for accounts. You can students into your roster, then assign reading passages (they have both fiction and informational text, as well as excerpts from novels) that come with an assessment and writing and discussion prompts. My favorite feature is being able to turn on the “guided reading mode” which allows the student to read part of the article, then answer a comprehension question before more text appears. This helps the student to read for meaning and think about the text while reading. For my tutoring students who are struggling readers, this is a huge help! Here’s their information on how they can help teachers with remote learning. (Note: While they have some passages for younger students, it’s mostly geared for grades 5 and up.)

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Just a few more online reading resources…

Tween Tribune from the Smithsonian – reading passages for K-12
Colorado Kids and the Mini Page
Kids’ Magazines (see photos below)

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Tell me in the comments about other reading resources for learning at home and watch for more posts soon on resources for teaching writing and math virtually or at home! Remember, we’re all in this together!

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