Travel and Teaching: Washington D.C. Part 2

IMG_1087Here’s the second post in my Travel and Teaching series (check out the FIRST one) about how teachers can bring their own travels back to their classrooms and enrich global and cultural awareness in their students. In a blog by Kay K. from Educational Tours, she writes “…[travel] promotes cultural understanding and encourages open-mindedness during key formative years.” Even if your students can’t travel, or have not traveled much, they can learn so much about other places if their teachers share their own experiences.

My first visit to the Washington D.C. area was an incredible learning experience for me! While there, I kept wishing I had a class full of students I could share all of this with, as I did in the past. Fortunately, I have been able to use my experiences on this trip to create some learning activities for my tutoring students and readers of this blog!

Arlington Cemetery

Arlington Cemetery…WOW! When I asked my elementary and high school tutoring students if they had heard about this place, most said no and none had visited there. So wrong! All students need to know about this beautiful, historic cemetery and the sacrifices our American soldiers have made for us over the last few hundred years. We were able to see the Kennedy gravesites, the gorgeous cherry trees in full blossom and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Below I shared a professional video of the Changing of the Guard as we were on the wrong end of the viewing area to get a good video. The one thing that impressed me the most about seeing this ceremony was the incredible respect and silence the hundreds of tourists had while watching this…even the children. Very amazing and moving! While walking through the cemetery I tried to read as many gravestones as I could; these people deserve to be remembered and I’m sure many Americans have ancestors buried here.  Below are some teaching resources for your students; feel free to use my photos as well (I have captions on all of them so you can explain them to your students).

Arlington Resources:
My Photos of Arlington
Kiddle Info on Arlington
Ben’s Guide Info on Arlington
Ducksters Info on Arlington
Kiddle Info on Robert F. Kennedy
Info on Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis
Info on the Kennedy gravesite at Arlington
Tomb of the Unknown Soldier
Facts for kids: Tomb of the Unknown Soldier
Video of the Changing of the Guard

IMG_0077National Archives Museum

We were so fortunate to be able to visit this incredible museum before hours and with just a few people! My stepson was re-enlisting in the army and this time, his ceremony was held in the rotunda of this beautiful place. Along with our family, and his wives’ family, there was just one other soldier re-enlisting, his family and the commanding officers of the two soldiers. This was an extremely moving ceremony to watch, especially as the soldiers vowed to uphold the Constitution right in FRONT of the actual document! We also had a tour guide who told us about all the documents on display, as well as the beautiful murals above them. We were not allowed to take photos, but they had an official army photographer who took pictures of my husband and me in front of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights! Needless to say, this teacher/history geek was in heaven!

Mount Vernon

Another exciting first for me…visiting the home of our first President! We had not planned this trip in advance and we would have had to wait three hours for the tour inside the home, so we will plan to do that on the next visit. However, we still able to walk around the home, see the recreated gardens and farm buildings, visit the slave quarters and the museum. I think one of the hardest things to teach our students is why our founding fathers had slaves, especially since they espousing freedom for all. Here’s a resource to help with that topic,  another and one more.  My favorite area of Mount Vernon was the front porch with the gorgeous views of the Potomac River. Thankfully, this view has been protected with no hotels, restaurants or other commercial buildings in sight. I found out later that this protected view took a great deal of effort and contributions!  I can just imagine George, Martha and their family and visitors sitting on the porch and enjoying this vista.

My Photos
Mount Vernon Official Website
Info and resources for teachers
Info and resources for students
Primary Sources
Dusksters Bio on George Washington
Ducksters Info on Martha Washington
Kiddle Info on Mount Vernon

Miscellaneous Washington D.C.

Sadly on this visit, we didn’t get into the White House or the Capitol Building…but for sure on the next visit! But here are some teaching resources for you and your students!

IMG_0146White House
(Can you see the sharpshooters on top of the White House? The security is crazy there!)

Kiddle Info on the White House
Fact Monster: The White House
American History for Kids: The White House
The White House history
The White House history in photos
Secret Service facts for kids

IMG_0152

The U.S. Capitol Building
U.S. Capitol Building
Kiddle Info for kids
Education resources for teachers and students

 

 

 

That’s it for this blog…until next time! Please post any comments or questions below!

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Travel and Teaching: Washington DC: Part 1

“What one learns in a classroom is just a very small part of learning process . The real learning starts when one crosses borders and travels miles for the real knowledge.” – Vivek Sahni

One of my passions, besides teaching, is travel! I have always believed that the classroom is not the only place to learn; in fact, I’ve learned some of my most lasting lessons while traveling. Back in my classrooms days, I brought back my experiences and lessons to my students so they could experience more of their world as well. I did this in a number of ways: through slideshows, displays of souvenirs and photos, and research activities on people and places. While working as a GT facilitator, I would post photos of my travels on Edmodo or Google Classroom and give the students challenges where they had to find out information about whatever was in the photo. I offered digital badges to those students who would complete the challenge first. I am still doing this with my tutoring students; when my husband and I took a two week trip to Italy in 2017, I left all of my students with some reading, writing and research activities on Italy.

Last week, I finally made it to Washington D.C.!  I can’t believe that someone who loves traveling and history, and has gotten to be this old and has never been there! I was also passionate about teaching my students American history and government! We were headed there to attend my stepson’s army reenlistment ceremony; it was going to be held at the National Archives Museum in the rotunda (more on that in my next blog!). I began planning in earnest to visit the places that my students (and my own daughters) and I had read about or seen in photos and movies. I have provided photos and links below that you help your students learn about these places and people. In addition, my visit has inspired me to create some learning activities for my tutoring students, and you will be able to use these activities with your students a well (more at the bottom of the blog)! Off we go to our nation’s capital. (All photos are by me unless otherwise credited.)

First, some general resources for you and your students on Washington D.C.

Our first day was spent on the National Mall. We, unfortunately, chose to go there on not just a Saturday, but on a day when the cherry blossoms were in full bloom! The crowds and traffic were insane, and to get anywhere on the mall, you had to walk quite a bit. But we managed to see several sites and loved learning about them with an audio tour from Atlantis Audio Tours. Here’s what we saw on the mall, with links for you and your students:

IMG_3594Washington Monument:  The Monument was closed for repairs…but I didn’t mind…just seeing it was amazing!

  • A lesson from the National Park Service in which students can see and analyze primary sources, as well as learn about the qualities of a leader and why George Washington was chosen to have a monument built in his name, as well as design their own monument for a leader of their choice.
  • Here’s a Reading A-Z book on this monument, appropriate for 1st/2nd grade.
  • ReadWorks article

 

World War II Memorial: Another amazing place to visit! In the audio tour, we learned about the features of the memorials and the significance of the bronze wreaths and rope connecting all the state and territory columns. In addition, there are famous quotes, engraved on the walls, from Franklin Roosevelt and others about this war.

  • Five lesson plans from The Friends of the National WWII Memorial, featuring “a culminating activity called, “World War II at the Memorial” connecting the lesson directly to features of the National World War II Memorial addressed in the lesson.

 

Lincoln Memorial: We arrived here with tired feet after starting at the Washington Monument, and slowly climbed the crowded steps.  But it was all worth it when we turned around to view the iconic view toward the Washington Monument, the same one Martin Luther King, Jr. saw during the “I Have a Dream” speech.

Jefferson_Pier_and_Washington_Monument
Jefferson Pier photo from Wikimedia Commons

The Jefferson Pier:  I know, you’re saying…”The what?!” But this is actually quite interesting and we would not have known about it except for our audio tour. This little nondescript marker (almost looks like a “mini” Washington Monument!) once had great ambitions of marking the prime meridian of the United States…if Thomas Jefferson had had his way! From the website Adventures in DC website: “He (Jefferson) had it located on the southern bank of Tiber Creek due south from the center of the White House and due west from the center of the U.S. Capitol. The creek no longer runs through the National Mall, but the stone remains.” Boats used to dock near this marker (the Potomac at that time came up near this point) to unload materials for building the Washington Monument. This poor little marker never became the U.S. Prime Meridian as our country chose to use the more standard Greenwich Meridian.

There were several memorials we were not able to get to, either due to time or exhaustion…but here are some teaching resources for them:

Jefferson Memorial:
Ben’s Guide Information
10 Fun facts about the Jefferson Memorial
YouTube video about the Memorial
Ducksters: Thomas Jefferson Biography

Martin Luther King Memorial
Ben’s Guide Information
Ducksters: Martin Luther King Jr. Biography

Korean War Memorial
Ben’s Guide Information
Duckster: The Korean War

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial
Ben’s Guide Information
– Ducksters: FDR Biography

IMG_0034
Photo by Jan Anttila

Cherry Blossoms: We saw some spectacular cherry blossoms around the D.C. areas…and not just at the National Mall! The history about these famed blossoms is quite interesting; here are some resources!

National Monument and Memorial Challenge: I wonder how many of our students across the country, who have not been to the DC area before, know about all the memorials for famous Americans…not just those on the National Mall, but many more located around our country.  I created a visual challenge in Google Slides for my students to see how many they could identify and if they knew who that famous person was. In this presentation, you have a photo that shows the monument with no label, and then one with the label.  At the end of the presentation are photos of some famous Americans who do NOT have one. I am having some of my students choose one of these persons, research them and then write a persuasive piece about WHY this person deserves a memorial. The students will then have a chance to design the memorial using whatever medium they would like. This idea is based on a lesson idea from the National Park Service.

This National Monument product is ON SALE on Teachers Pay Teachers, Here’s the LINK! If you like these materials, please let me know in the comments or in TpT reviews.

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Photos by Jan Anttila